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silkshadow

What happens after you manualy pull a drive but don't replace it right away?

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I am having a problem on a Win 7 x86 desktop. I built a small pool of 4 4TB drives, I am not at home but in my beach house. One of the drives suddenly was marked dirty by Windows. It ran a chkdsk upon boot and a bunch of sectors were unreadable. Yikes.

 

I let it run and then booted into windows. There were no SMART errors, but I tried to pull the drive and DB crashed. On reboot, Windows wouldn't load. Safe mode, SFC, etc and I was able to boot Windows. Upon boot the pool mount point "F:"was not there. Tried to launch the DB manager and DB manager locked up. Tried to open task manager to kill it, and then Windows locked up and there was no way to break the system freeze. Force power off.

 

Crap. So I am pretty sure DB is taking my whole Windows system down and its due to the dying drive. The data is mostly duplicated and only about 10% of it is actually unique data, the rest is all copied from my home server. So I am not too worried about the data, however it took a month to download it all (only net here is spotty LTE and solid but slow HSDPA) and I would hate to have to do that again.

 

The thing is, I have no extra hard drives here and I have no means to buy it (I am on an island with maybe a few hundred people and no computer stores anywhere and no post office). Right now I have not powered the system back on, but I kind of need to.

 

So what I am wondering is what happens when I force remove the drive (unplug it) and leave it that way for a week or so? Is any of my data in trouble, will the pool still be usable?

 

Also, a quick unrelated followup that I have been meaning to ask for a few months. I bought 2 DB licenses in the by one get one free promo and I was only emailed 1 key. So is that one key a dual use license?

 

Thanks!

 

 

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I think you should open a 2 tickets. One for the DB drive issue and one for the license question.

 

On the bad drive problem I think I would have tried to remove the drive using DB drives dashboard in the DB manager before physically pulling the drive. When the drive is pulled I would think DB would put the pool in read only until you take action. Since the drive has been pulled I think you should do a Repair pool (pool dashboard, under advanced settings in the DB manager).

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This probably doesn't help silkshadow but I've had a failed drive in the past too and it hasn't stopped Windows from booting. My pool went into read-only mode though and I had files missing (correctly though as I don't have duplication on for everything!)

 

Really not sure why yours didn't boot afterwards :(

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Thanks guys! To be clear, I do not blame DB for taking the system down. I think the bad drive is breaking DB and several services and other apps on this box depend on the DB pool are breaking Windows. Either way the solution is to pull the drive.

 

My concern is running the DB pool in R/O mode for an extended period. I've never had to do that before, so was just checking if anyone knew of any unintended/unforeseen issues apart from the normal R/O issues? Especially in regards to the 10% of data that is duplicated and unique to this box (all pictures and home videos).

 

Thanks!

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Just to answer my own question here, I experienced no problems to existing data that is duplicated or not resident on the failed drive. I opted to pulled the drive and do a pool repair as running in Fault Tolerant/read-only mode was making me way too nervous.

 

However, after the failed drive's removal my existing space was not sufficient to restore all the duplicated data. So some of the data was unavailable to me unless I mounted the drive the duplicated data was resident on, and searched for it in the duplicated folder. Also, I experienced high CPU usage from DB while it tried to restore data that there was no room for. Or I should say I assume that was the cause and it seemed that way when watching the log activity, but I am not sure that was the cause. CPU usage spiked to over 50% for extended periods.

 

We had a typhoon hit us and we had to chopper back to civilization before the storm hit. I was unable to find a 4TB drive replacement though, and my plan was to find a 4TB drive and then restore the sector by sector image I had taken of the failed drive. I was only able to pickup 2 2TB drives.

 

Anyway, I brought it back to our island when it was safe today. I can see that the data that was unable to be restored before is now getting restored. Unless something else happens, it looks like, even after extended time up with a removed drive and limited free space, I suffered no duplicated data loss.

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